SUPERINTENDENT’S REPORT

 

BOARD MEETING

 

MONDAY, JUNE 23RD, 2003



At the request of the Department of Education, the Cape Breton-Victoria Regional School Board submitted a list of school capital needs on October 17th, 2000. This list was reviewed by the School Capital Construction Committee and recommendations were submitted to the Government of Nova Scotia on the school capital process and provincial priorities.

 

We were fortunate to have received a new Jr. High School for Glace Bay. The new school in Glace Bay will cost $13 million dollars and will begin in 2005 and will open in 2008-2009. At the same time, a new $16 million dollar school will be built in North Sydney which will have 850 students from Grades P - 9. The starting date is 2005 and will open in 2008-2009.

 

Along with our new school construction, the Cape Breton-Victoria Regional School Board has also received an announcement on eight(8) projects that will total $24 million dollars ranging from $6 million to $150,000. [Attached is a list of the new schools and the renovation and repair list.] We are very happy with the commitment made by the Department of Education and will begin our pre-construction input process with our communities and the school sites involved.

 

Last month, I began a process to talk about our staff. My first comments were directed towards the largest contingent in our work force - the teachers. My intent was not to go into every facet of the role of a teacher but zero in on one central focus, that being the delivery of a class lesson. Teachers do a great deal of other duties and they are actually a twenty-four hour teacher - a teacher whose day does not end with the final bell, whose work week does not end on Friday afternoon, whose commitment to the ideals of the profession does not end with the marking period or the term or the school year. Teachers have made themselves available to their students at all times - to help, to advise or just to talk.

 

This now brings me to our next staff segment - the Principal of the school who is also a teacher. Recognizing that it is the principal of a school with whom most people have contact, schools are moving to acquaint the public with what it takes to become a principal. As the instructional leader and administrator of the school, the principal is the primary contact for the community, serving the needs of students, teachers, parents, and citizens of the area. The route which leads to the principalship is one that calls for a long-term commitment to education and an accumulation of experience. It is a path designed to develop the expertise it takes to be a principal. Discussion of the requirements will serve to raise public awareness of the role of the principal and bring the education, background and training that are required in the spotlight.

 

Most principals begin their career as classroom teachers. In fact, in many provinces, teaching experience is a prerequisite for school administration. After completing the four or five years that are needed to qualify for a teaching certificate and experiencing some time as a classroom teacher, a person is ready to begin the course of study leading toward becoming a principal.

 

The program of study for those who wish to become principals involves graduate-level courses in such topics as school law, school finance, personnel management, pupil services, school plant management, fiscal management and supervision and improvement of instruction. Supervised field experience and an internship may also be required. The program may culminate in a master’s degree, though many aspiring school principals continue to the doctoral-level degree. Whatever the terminal goal, the program requires a long-term commitment of time and considerable expenditure of money.

 

Formal education is the foundation of professional development for the school principal; added to that is the expertise that continues to grow with experience. The job calls for a person with a solid subject-matter base, a thorough understanding of how to work with people, and dedication to the educational process.

 

As instructional leader in the school, the principal must be an expert in curriculum and in the ways that students learn. He or she must know teaching methods and be able to evaluate the effectiveness of the teaching-learning process. As building administrator, the principal must be a responsible keeper of school property and work with many others in seeing that the school environment is safe , comfortable and appropriately used.

 

The people side of being a principal calls for a genuine concern for students, teachers and parents. The principal is a model for all and a counselor and problem solver sought out by those in school and in the community.

 

Educators, in attempting to answer the question of what it takes to become a school principal, call attention to the wide variety of skills and attributes necessary for the job. The time and effort needed to acquire what it takes represent a formidable challenge. The fact that many have risen to the challenge speaks of the motivation and self-discipline that are needed to arrive at the goal.

 

Contact the principal of your local school. Find out what it took for him or her to become a school principal. Ask about the administration of the teaching-principal program and how you can become a cooperating member of the effort. Your interest in your school is needed and the place to begin is with your principal. My next report in September will be focused on the Teacher Assistants.

 

Over the past ten months, we have all worked at our tasks and solved many problems which arose during the school year, 2002-2003. When I say we, one includes the Cape Breton-Victoria Regional School Board, the entire staff of the school board, the student population, the parents and concerned communities at large. Now this school year draws to an end as summer approaches, but our interests for the regional board continues. The entire board wishes you health and happiness during the days that are to come. Enjoy yourselves and we will see you in September - rested and ready for another year, as great as the one we have just had. Mr. Chair - the additions to my report are attached.

 

 

JUNE, 2003 

 

 

 

 

SCHOOL CAPITAL PROGRAM

JUNE, 2003

 

 

SCHOOL

PROJECT

FUNDING

APPROVAL

START UP

    DATE

COMPLETION

DATE

Glace Bay Jr. High

New Construction

$13,000,000

2005-2006

2008-2009

Northside Elem. Jr. High

New Construction

$16,000,000

2005-2006

2008-2009

Baddeck Elem.

Addition/Alterations

$ 6,230,000

2007

2012

Cusack Elem.

Addition/Alterations

$ 3,750,000

2007

2011

Donkin Complex (Gym)

Addition/Alterations

$ 1,620,000

2007

2010

Riverview Rural High

Addition/Alterations

$ 4,075,000

2003

2009

St. Agnes/Mt. Carmel Elem.

Addition/Alterations

$ 4,750,000

2008

2012

St. Anne’s

Addition/Alterations

$ 4,050,000

2007

2011

Sydney Academy

Addition/Alterations

$ 6,000,000

2003

2009

Sydney River Elem.

Alterations

$ 150,000

currently

underway

2004